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If you are over 65 or have one of the following , Chronic (long-term) respiratory disease, such as severe asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchitis, Chronic heart disease, such as heart failure, Chronic kidney disease at stage three, four or five, Chronic liver disease, Chronic neurological disease, such as Parkinson’s disease or motor neurone disease, or learning disability, Diabetes, Splenic dysfunction or asplenia, Weakened immune system due to disease (such as HIV/AIDS) or treatment (such as cancer treatment),Pregnant women or Carer.

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At Macklin Street Surgery both Dr Helen Lever and Dr Minal Martin are qualified in fitting and removing Implants and coils. We can provide this service to all of our registered patients free of charge.

Contraceptive implant

The contraceptive implant (Nexplanon) is a small flexible plastic rod that's placed under the skin in your upper arm by a doctor or nurse.

It releases the hormone progestogen into your bloodstream to prevent pregnancy and lasts for 3 years.

Facts about the implant;

    • The implant is more than 99% effective
    • Once the implant is in place, you don't have to think about it again for 3 years
    • It can be useful for women who can't use contraception that contains oestrogen
    • It's very useful for women who find it difficult to remember to take a pill at the same time every day
    • The implant can be taken out if you have side effects
    • You can have it removed at any time, and your natural fertility will return very quickly
    • When it's first put in, you may feel some bruising, tenderness or swelling around the implant
    • Your periods may become irregular, lighter, heavier or longer
    • A common side effect is that your periods stop (amenorrhoea). It's not harmful, but you may want to consider this before deciding to have an implant
    • Some medicines can make the implant less effective
    • It doesn't protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so you may need to use condoms as well.

Intrauterine device (IUD)

An IUD is a small, T-shaped plastic and copper device that's put into your womb (uterus) by a doctor or nurse.

It releases copper to stop you getting pregnant and protects against pregnancy for between 5 and 10 years. It's sometimes called a "coil" or "copper coil".

Facts about the IUD;

    • When inserted correctly, IUDs are more than 99% effective
    • An IUD works as soon as it's put in and lasts for 5 to 10 years, depending on the type
    • It can be put in at any time during your menstrual cycle, as long as you're not pregnant.
    • It can be taken out at any time by a specially trained doctor or nurse. It's then possible to get pregnant straight away
    • Your periods can be heavier, longer or more painful in the first 3 to 6 months after an IUD is put in. You might get spotting or bleeding between periods
    • There's a small risk of getting an infection after it's been fitted
    • There's a small risk that your body may push out the IUD or it may move – your doctor or nurse will teach you how to check it's in place
    • It can be uncomfortable when the IUD is put in, but painkillers can help
    • It may not be suitable if you've had previous pelvic infections
    • It doesn't protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so you may need to use condoms as well.

Intrauterine system (IUS)

An IUS is a small, T-shaped plastic device that's put into your womb (uterus) by a doctor or nurse.

It releases the hormone progestogen to stop you getting pregnant and lasts for 3 to 5 years.

Two brands of IUS are used in the UK: Mirena and Jaydess.


Facts about the IUS;

    • When inserted correctly, it's more than 99% effective
    • It can be taken out at any time by a specially trained doctor or nurse. It's possible to get pregnant straight after it's removed
    • It can make your periods lighter, shorter or stop altogether, so it may help women who have heavy or painful periods
    • It can be used by women who can't use combined contraception (such as the combined pill) – for example, those who have migraines
    • Once the IUS is in place, you don't have to think about it
    • Some women may experience side effects, such as mood swings, skin problems or breast tenderness
    • There's a small risk of getting an infection after it's been fitted
    • It can be uncomfortable when the IUS is put in, but painkillers can help
    • The IUS can be fitted at any time during your monthly menstrual cycle, as long as you're not pregnant
    • The IUS doesn't protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so you may need to use condoms as well.

 
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