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Extended Access

From the 28th June 2019 all extended access appointments will be at Horizon Healthcare 3 Burton Road, Derby, DE1 1TH.

We will no longer be offering evening appointments at Macklin Street Surgery on a Tuesday and Thursday but will offer appointments 7 days a week at Wellside.

Opening Times

Monday to Friday 6pm – 8pm

Saturday 8am – 12pm

Sunday 9.30am – 12.30pm  

What conditions can be treated?

The hubs are designed to treat patients with acute minor ailments who require a face-to-face clinical assessment in order to be treated appropriately. It will be primarily GP & Nurse Practitioner appointments.

Appointments are made via the patient’s own GP surgery and are available to patients who are unable to access appointments during normal surgery hours or when surgery appointments are fully booked.

 People who cannot be seen: 

  • Babies under 12 weeks old
  • Pregnancy-related problems
  • Chronic disease or long-term condition management that requires continuity of care
  • Severe mental health problems
  • Patients identified with a potentially life-threatening medical condition which requires referral to urgent or emergency care settings
  • Walk-in patients

At Macklin Street Surgery both Dr Helen Lever and Dr Minal Martin are qualified in fitting and removing Implants and coils. We can provide this service to all of our registered patients free of charge.

Contraceptive implant

The contraceptive implant (Nexplanon) is a small flexible plastic rod that's placed under the skin in your upper arm by a doctor or nurse.

It releases the hormone progestogen into your bloodstream to prevent pregnancy and lasts for 3 years.

Facts about the implant;

    • The implant is more than 99% effective
    • Once the implant is in place, you don't have to think about it again for 3 years
    • It can be useful for women who can't use contraception that contains oestrogen
    • It's very useful for women who find it difficult to remember to take a pill at the same time every day
    • The implant can be taken out if you have side effects
    • You can have it removed at any time, and your natural fertility will return very quickly
    • When it's first put in, you may feel some bruising, tenderness or swelling around the implant
    • Your periods may become irregular, lighter, heavier or longer
    • A common side effect is that your periods stop (amenorrhoea). It's not harmful, but you may want to consider this before deciding to have an implant
    • Some medicines can make the implant less effective
    • It doesn't protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so you may need to use condoms as well.

Intrauterine device (IUD)

An IUD is a small, T-shaped plastic and copper device that's put into your womb (uterus) by a doctor or nurse.

It releases copper to stop you getting pregnant and protects against pregnancy for between 5 and 10 years. It's sometimes called a "coil" or "copper coil".

Facts about the IUD;

    • When inserted correctly, IUDs are more than 99% effective
    • An IUD works as soon as it's put in and lasts for 5 to 10 years, depending on the type
    • It can be put in at any time during your menstrual cycle, as long as you're not pregnant.
    • It can be taken out at any time by a specially trained doctor or nurse. It's then possible to get pregnant straight away
    • Your periods can be heavier, longer or more painful in the first 3 to 6 months after an IUD is put in. You might get spotting or bleeding between periods
    • There's a small risk of getting an infection after it's been fitted
    • There's a small risk that your body may push out the IUD or it may move – your doctor or nurse will teach you how to check it's in place
    • It can be uncomfortable when the IUD is put in, but painkillers can help
    • It may not be suitable if you've had previous pelvic infections
    • It doesn't protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so you may need to use condoms as well.

Intrauterine system (IUS)

An IUS is a small, T-shaped plastic device that's put into your womb (uterus) by a doctor or nurse.

It releases the hormone progestogen to stop you getting pregnant and lasts for 3 to 5 years.

Two brands of IUS are used in the UK: Mirena and Jaydess.


Facts about the IUS;

    • When inserted correctly, it's more than 99% effective
    • It can be taken out at any time by a specially trained doctor or nurse. It's possible to get pregnant straight after it's removed
    • It can make your periods lighter, shorter or stop altogether, so it may help women who have heavy or painful periods
    • It can be used by women who can't use combined contraception (such as the combined pill) – for example, those who have migraines
    • Once the IUS is in place, you don't have to think about it
    • Some women may experience side effects, such as mood swings, skin problems or breast tenderness
    • There's a small risk of getting an infection after it's been fitted
    • It can be uncomfortable when the IUS is put in, but painkillers can help
    • The IUS can be fitted at any time during your monthly menstrual cycle, as long as you're not pregnant
    • The IUS doesn't protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so you may need to use condoms as well.

 
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